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Wednesday, December 11, 2013

5 Secrets (What No One Knows About My Book)

Our guest author today is E. Ayers, who is going to share some tidbits about the writing of her book that no one knows--until  today.

E. Ayers is an Amazon best-selling author in Western Romance and she also writes contemporary romances. When she least expected it, she found her prince charming and married him five weeks later. She uses that heart-warming passion as a basis for all her books, because she believes everyone needs someone to love.


 

A Snowy Christmas in Wyoming

 1: When I sat to write A Snowy Christmas in Wyoming, I didn't think of it as anything other than a little Christmas story. Considering it was Christmas story, what better time to think about all those wonderful family values? And I certainly didn't consider it a western. I didn't write westerns! After completion, I was told I had written a sweet western. But it was just a Christmas story!
2: A Snowy Christmas in Wyoming spent over seven months on the best selling western lists on Amazon.
3: I knew nothing about the Crow tribe when I started writing the story other than there are some very handsome men in some old photos and the reservation is located directly above Wyoming. I knew almost nothing about the tribe when I finished the story. Oh, did that change!
4: I've known several folks tied to the news programs. They don't have a life. The broadcast company owns them. Their hair is cut, colored, and styled according to the company. The company tells them what they will wear, etc. Any free time they have is controlled. They are an image and it must be protected at all times.
5: The success of this book triggered off the series of Creed's Crossing, Wyoming, and the diary of Clare Coleman mentioned in A Snowy Christmas in Wyoming prompted my foray into historical westerns. That diary will also be available soon. My short story A Christmas Far From Home in A Sweetwater Springs Christmas with Debra Holland uses the grandson of Clare Coleman. As I was writing that story, I realized I had another, A Rancher's Woman. It should start appearing at the e-stores next week.
 
My sweet little western A Snowy Christmas in Wyoming has become the catalyst for so many other stories. Available separately, it is also part of the boxed set, Christmas on Main Street by the Main Street Authors. That's 11 Christmas books by your favorite best selling authors for one low price. (Guess who is a Main Street author?)

 BLURB from A SNOWY CHRISTMAS in WYOMING

A Native American cowboy and a national TV news anchorwoman have nothing in common except for their pasts. Is love preordained? An old diary from when Jessie and Clare Coleman settled on the land in the 1840's provides a history of their life. But tucked between the pages is an unrequited love between Clare Coleman and a tall Native American. Does love and land come full circle? In this season of giving, will fate reach through time to give a gift of love?

Andy Coyote settled into the job as foreman on the Coleman ranch. He's got custody of his thirteen month old daughter and the situation is perfect for both of them until Caroline Coleman returns home for Christmas and one of the worst blizzards in years hits the area. He's forced to accept Caroline's help to move a herd of cattle and mixed in it are several head from another ranch in the community. Cattle rustling still happens.

Caroline Coleman has her dream job as a Washington, D.C., news anchor for a national broadcast, but home is in Wyoming on her family's ranch. She has everything that money can buy, but the things that she really wants can't be purchased. Raised with solid, hard working, family values, she knows her life in the spotlight isn't real. She wants a man who appreciates the ranch, loves her for who she is and not what she is, and she wants a family of her own. And she doesn't like the idea of Andy Coyote taking advantage of her grandmother.



To Buy A SNOWY CHRISTMAS in WYOMING go to 
Amazon: http://amzn.com/B006B3IOIK; for Christmas on Main Street (boxed set) go to
Amazon: http://amzn.com/B00GCPPALG
B&N: http://ow.ly/rEG4K Apple: http://ow.ly/rEGoH
Smashwords: http://ow.ly/rEIFj; for Sweetwater Springs Christmas go to Amazon: http://amzn.com/B00G06W3SA

You find E. Ayers on these links:
www.ayersbooks.com
Twitter: @ayersbooks
Blog: authorsofmainstreet.wordpress.com
 
Thanks for checking E. Ayers and her secrets out. If you have any comments or questions let us know. E. Ayers will be around to answer your comments.
And don't forget to check back next week for another of our 5 Secrets.


 

 

21 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for having me and allowing me to share with your readers. I still say it's just a contemporary romance that just happens to take place in Wyoming. But I'll let the readers decide. And I'm not telling who I know in the national news business. LOL

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  2. I loved Christmas in Wyoming. What a great idea to link all your books the way you have. I haven't read Sweetwater Springs Christmas, but it's keeping warm on my Kindle. Keep 'em coming, E!

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  3. Thank you so much, Jane. I know you like a cowboy so I'm sure you will enjoy reading about Frank Coleman and his intended Adie Reiner in 1895. Thanks so much for stopping by.

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  4. I love your books! Yes, they will love your The Rancher's Woman!

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    1. I'm crossing my fingers as it's my first solid venture into historical westerns. Keeping it historically accurate has been difficult. Thanks for stopping, Jan, and for the vote of confidence.

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  5. I loved that story. Very heartwarming. Best luck with your anthology..quite a line-up there!

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    1. Thanks for stopping, Rose, and for the well wishes.It was fun writing Andy Coyote's story in A Snowy Christmas in Wyoming. He was such an underdog. Anyone who has lived in a small town area knows there's always that one family.

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  6. How interesting. Thanks for sharing your process, E. Talk about coloring outside the lines...or in your case writing outside the lines. Great good luck with your many projects.

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    1. Thanks, JD. I know your books, and you just grab a headline and then go for it! Let's just say you'll never be in charge of tourism. LOL But who needs lines to confine us?

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  7. Wow. I love that stories just spawn off other books. Best wishes with your sales! :)

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    1. Thanks for stopping, Melissa. Isn't it amazing? One little Christmas book triggered all this other stuff.I stopped writing the diary to write for Sweetwater Springs Christmas and found myself ripping Adie's sister and her interest in Many Feathers out of it. UGH! That story has grown into an 80K book!

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  8. E., I have our boxed set on my Kindle. Can't wait to read your story!

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    1. As soon as I manage to get A Rancher's Woman published, I intend to find a quiet corner and spend it reading all the wonderful stories in the boxed set and in Sweetwater Springs Christmas. So far I only have read about half of the stories in each publication. Anthologies and boxed sets are a great way for people to discover new authors.

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  9. How interesting to hear your feelings about your story. And isn't writing Christmas stories fun? Happy holidays!

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    1. I think I'd love to write just Christmas stories! In fact, many of my stories have Christmas in them. It really is a wonderful time of the year. Happy holidays to you, too!

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  10. Thanks for sharing your secrets, E. I just downloaded the boxed set and look forward to reading the stories. I find this year the Christmas novels and movies are helping get me into the holiday spirits. Wishing you ongoing success with your books!

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    1. Thanks so much, Gemma. I hope you enjoy all the books in the box. They are all very different. And you can't beat our sale price of 99 cents.

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  11. Wonderful post. I love the premise of your series. I must look for the books. Thanks.

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    1. Hi, Cara. Thanks so much for visiting Beverley's blog. I just love adding to the TBR pile! And I have lots of books to be added. Just remember that my westerns tend to be sweeter, but I do go to about a medium on the heat scale with my other books. But I've seriously enjoyed writing the westerns. I love the city and all that it has to offer, but I love living in the country. It has a different feel and a different pace to it. People know their neighbors even if their neighbors are miles away.

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  12. E., I understand exactly what you mean with your comment, "Keeping it historically accurate has been difficult." I love the research part of writing westerns/historicals, but man-oh-man the research can cut into precious writing time. Maybe it’s just me, but every so often, I get sidetracked on a tidbit of history that is so darn interesting that, two hours later, I realize I’m a dozen websites away from where I started. ;-) I'm looking forward to reading the stories. Thanks for sharing your
    "5".

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    1. Hi Kaye, great to see you here. I've had to take a few liberties with my Crow Indians and generalize a few things. Some tribes have more written history. Some of what was written isn't accurate. Grr! (How am I supposed to figure that mess out? This historian says this and that one says something different? Help!) It's been a real adventure. But I'm loving it.

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