Friday, February 23, 2018

Your Characters and You


This month’s topic is: Your characters come from your mind, sometimes interpretations of
other people you've witnessed or met, but can you create character lives without revealing something about yourself? Have your characters ever taught you something?
This one had me thinking. In Don’t Go I wrote in character based on some I didn’t like and some of the things they did. It was very cathartic. I guess in some ways it revealed something of myself an how I handled situations – in writing not real life. In Hunted at he beginning I put myself in the heroine’s position to get the feeling of how she’d react, so again I guess that reveals something of myself and how I would react in similar situations.

Because we are writers and have to make our characters come alive for our readers I think some of the feelings, emotions and reactions have to so come from us. So yes, I think my books do reveal something about myself.
Have my characters ever taught me something? This one’s a little trickier. Do my books teach me anything? Absolutely. Every book I write I research so I’m always learning something. In my Hawkins Ranch series, I learned a lot about ranching and the Blackfoot nation. From my characters, maybe. In Hunted, I wrote the story but maybe I learned you can’t do everything alone and sometimes other people do have good input. In Targeted, again it’s what I wrote, but sometimes we don’t always want what we think we want.
I’m looking forward to seeing what other writers have to say on this topic. Don’t forget to check them out.

Skye Taylor http://www.skye-writer.com/blogging_by_the_sea
A.J. Maguire 
http://ajmaguire.wordpress.com/
Marci Baun 
http://www.marcibaun.com/blog/
Marie Laval
http://marielaval.blogspot.co.uk/
Judith Copek
http://lynx-sis.blogspot.com/
Dr. Bob Rich
https://wp.me/p3Xihq-1c1
Rachael Kosinski
http://rachaelkosinski.weebly.com/
Connie Vines https://mizging.blogspot.com/
Rhobin L Courtright
http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com

20 comments:

  1. I LOVE the research part of the book and we do learn so much as we strive to make our characters come alive. Good post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Skye. I agree we learn so much from our research.

      Delete
  2. Writing is such a wonderful occupation, isn't it? We get to learn so much by doing research, and we even get to live in someone's else shoes for a while, even if my heroines always have something of me. I don't think I could relate to someone drastically different from me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right, Marie. Writing is a wonderful occupation, if not a challenging one. Thanks for dropping by.

      Delete
  3. I've also learned amazing things from the research I do for stories.

    Emotions are universal human traits, and while we all react differently, I think enough similarity remains for everyone to understand feelings and reaction authors develop in their characters, even when based on their own responses.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that's an excellent point. There is a universality of similar emotions, but we react differently based on our own history.

      Delete
  4. Beverley, this is a bit of a different take from my interpretation of the topic. You explained how you learn from being a writer. I saw my characters as being my teachers.
    Both are true, right?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Different people will always have a different interpretation based on their own individuality and I agree - both our interpretations are right. And we're both learning.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I wrote about a person I didn't like once, and then we were thrown together in a big project at work. As I got to know him, the character I was writing about became more and more sympathetic. Strange things happen when we write. I think that it can be hard to pinpoint, but that in some way our characters do teach us something. Of course that means we're actually teaching ourselves as we write.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good point - that we're actually teaching ourselves as we write. I like that.

      Delete
  7. I learn a lot when writing books because, generally, my muse likes exotic places which require research. (If only I had the budget to visit them. LOL) Sometimes, I learn something from my characters, even if it's a struggle to get it on the page and how to overcome that. :)

    Marci

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, we always learn when we research and sometimes from characters, but that's harder.

      Delete
  8. Beverly,
    I found you statement on the 'universal emotions. an excellent point.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I have also felt a scene was cathartic...both in books I've read, and in books I've written. It's really wonderful for me, when writing a scene helps me to deal with some issue in my own life. I can only hope that it helps others as well.

    ReplyDelete
  10. That's really cool that you can work out your own issues with your writing.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Amazing site you shared with theirs. Understudies get excessively confounded and being pressurized in the determination of the field. We give you the learning and data that visit site to encourages you in the determination of field.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I really like the info about the character. Its pleasure to peruse how one can enhance training gauge of him. In the bygone eras, when there look here were deficient offices and the general population for the most part stayed denied of the instruction however now the entire situation has been changed.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Good blog post, This is the helping material for the understudies and every last one of the centers are so expanded and make the issues. I figure understudies should visit this click here site and gain their data.

    ReplyDelete
  14. This is amazing writing i can say that this kinda writing give us more ideas towards such issue. So find more tips here about writing perfectly in no time.

    ReplyDelete