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Thursday, October 1, 2015

Do I or Don't I?


I took a podcast on increasing your email list this week. It was interesting. Mainly I need to develop a mailing list and sends out a newsletter or post. He recommended sending one out every Friday giving some tips and talking about my book.
To sell books newsletters and mailing lists apparently are a necessity. Some people have over 10,000 on their mailing list. It's a little like cold contacting, asking people to join.  
I think it takes time away from writing, but he suggested writing 250 words each day and that's your post for Friday.
Do I or Don't I?

I get author newsletters, but often I just glance at them and then click delete.
According to an article by Debbie Young at http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org/reaching-readers-with-author-newsletters/ newsletters provide a more intimate, personal communication than can be achieved by a blog post or social media message; offer an alternative means of communication that might better suit those who don’t feel comfortable with social media messaging and give you a means of reaching readers entirely within your own control – not at the mercy of social media which, worst case, might disappear, taking your contacts with them.

Her reasons for not doing one are if you’re already very active and visible on social media and elsewhere; if you’re too pushed for time and have other priorities (not least writing new books!) or if you simply don’t want to do one! – spend your time on what you enjoy instead.

As a reader, do you like newsletters? Why? Do I or Don't I?

15 comments:

  1. A very tough and very personal question, Beverly. I have a blog and a newsletter. My blog has morphed into something more for writers. My newsletter is reserved for reaching out my readers. Both have their purpose, but both take time and effort. The only way I could answer the question, was to decide if I was committed enough to continue once I started. You have great blog, but if you're only reaching writers, then maybe a newsletter is the way to go. Good luck with whatever you decide.

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  2. Thanks Stanalei. I appreciate your input. Good points.

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  3. I don't like newsletters. I don't read the ones I get, or even open them. I would rather get news on my own thru facebook or thru Amazon.

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    1. Thanks, Melissa. I totally get that.

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  4. I agree that newsletters can take time away from writing, but I find that some of my readers only figure out that I have a new book out through my newsletter despite links in backmatter and on social media. So I keep doing it!

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    1. Thanks, Jessie. That's the one point that I've heard a few times, that the readers like to know when a book is coming out and a newsletter is the best way to do that.. Do you just send a newsletter out when you have a book coming out, or do you send one out in between?

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  5. I think a weekly newsletter is too much for most writers...and readers. Once a month is plenty and even quarterly, or when you have release coming up is fine. it depends on your readers. I only do occasional newsletters and depend on my FB page and twitter to connect with readers daily or weekly. it totally depends on how much you really have to say and what kind of time you want to devote to it.

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  6. Weekly newsletters? In addition to the daily social media "chores" I perform -- mainly Twitter retweets of tweets that have mentioned me, and Triberr shares of other bloggers' posts, which is how I found, and shared, this one???

    Gaah... I'd never get anything done with respect to my writing.

    I publish my newsletter The Dawnflier monthly, and a version of it goes up on my blog, since my newsletter audience is only around 650. I gear it for reader engagement too, usually leading off with something personal that I wouldn't otherwise mention via social media. (This month it was the near-loss of one of our cats to a gall bladder condition.) As with fiction writing, the newsletter post should contain a hook that entices folks to keep reading. Marketing wisdom states that the longer you can keep a potential customer engaged with your product, the more likely you are to land the sale.

    Happy writing--and newsletter-ing! :)
    Kim Headlee
    Stories make us greater.

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    1. Some good marketing points, Kim. I do Triberr and try to retweet. So many things and so little time. I may try one with my next book and then quarterly.

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    2. I agree with Kim. I should do a monthly newsletter, though I currently do a "release" newsletter.

      Do any of you find that swag helps retain readers of newsletters, or entice people to join your mailing list?

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    3. I agree with Kim. I should do a monthly newsletter, though I currently do a "release" newsletter.

      Do any of you find that swag helps retain readers of newsletters, or entice people to join your mailing list?

      Delete
    4. Interesting thought, L.A. I'm wondering how swag would work.
      What sort of things are you thinking about?

      Delete
  7. I think a monthly newsletter is more than sufficient, and many authors only send a newsletter when they have a book announcement. I don't subscribe to many newsletters, but I follow so many blogs via RSS that I tend to keep up with releases that way. My editing newsletter offer tips, but engaging content for author newsletters yet eludes me. If the info can be a blog post, is it also necessary to communicate similar info in a newsletter? Especially is both mailing lists may be essentially the same? It's a very individual decision. For me it comes down to how much energy I can put into it.

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  8. Good points and questions. I believe the post I read felt the newsletter was more for readers and people who didn't follow blogs. It was an extra way to contact your followers. And I have enough challenges writing a blog or two every week. Leslie mentioned swag and I'm going to play with that idea. Still haven't made a decision.

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  9. Regarding "swag" -- I have mixed views on the subject, because in my opinion the item should contain a way for people to purchase your book or else you're just wasting your money. To that end I've settled upon a practice of creating note cards (blank inside, with envelope) that feature art from my book on the front, and an explanation of the art and QR codes that link to the e-book product pages on the back. And I autograph them. I've not yet offered those for newsletter subscriptions though, because it entails having to get the winner's physical address.

    Once, I offered a free audiobook download code to the first three people to spot the offer in the newsletter and reply to it, but that never netted any reviews -- which is the main reason for giving away your books.

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