StatCounter

Monday, May 22, 2017

By Design is Finished


By Design is up for pre-order!

Finally I managed to get back to working on my writing and get this book finished. By Design is now up at Amazon and iTunes for Preorder. And it will publish on May 31st, 2017.
 
Nurse Evie Dalton succumbs to the temptation of a lot of money and a chance to work with the attractive Dr. Adam Marsden. She accepts a position at an isolated hospital. On arrival she finds an onsite animal farm attached to the hospital and mysterious limos arriving in the dark. There are screams in the night. People disappear and turn up dead. There’s no way to leave the hospital and area once you start work there and no communication outside the small town.

Dr. Adam Marsden left his past behind. Now he thinks has it all; a great job, money, and a chance to buy his own hospital. But he hadn't counted on Evie Dalton breaking through his tough emotionless shell. Now, because of him, she’s at risk and might be the next victim. Depending on his decisions, they could both be running for their lives.
 
If you read the book, I’d appreciate honest feedback.

I’m also looking at upgrading my website http://www.beverleybateman.com
It’s been awhile and I guess it’s about time I got a new photo, too. :(
I’m no longer that red-head. I’m now going gray.
I am looking for a web designer, preferably in Canada, mainly because of the dollar difference. If anyone has any suggestions, I’d appreciate it.

Any comments are welcome and I hope you check back Thursday for another guest talking about our heroines.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Deb Sanders on Heroines


This week we’re talking to going to author Deb Sanders. May’s theme is ‘Heroines’ so Deb will be talking about heroines.
Beverley: What do you think makes a heroine, either in real life or in books?
Deb: Heroines contain an inner strength that allows them to overcome extreme odds and face insurmountable obstacles, often as simple as trying to raise a family while working two jobs. There's usually a character arc even in real life where the heroine comes out on the other side wiser, stronger and more compassionate.
Beverley: Is it important to have strong conflicts? If yes, inner or outer conflicts, or both?
Deb: I believe it depends on the genre. Character based stories usually deal with inner conflict but I prefer both. I like action so I use outer conflict as a catalyst for internal growth.
Beverley: Who are your favorite heroines, and why?
Deb: I really enjoyed Jane Eyre because she was a meek woman who found inner strength in an era where it was not as acceptable. Today, I would choose Katniss Everdeen in the Hunger Games trilogy. She's an unwilling heroine who tackles her new found power with zest. I especially enjoyed the fact she accepted that life does not always follow our dreams but often gives us something better.
Beverley: Tell me about the heroines in your book/s.
Deb: Daisy O'Connor spent part of her childhood on a Lakota reservation where she and her mother endured abusive treatment from her step-father. Her beloved adopted grandfather taught her Native ways so she has a spiritual base. When she eventually relocates to Atlanta, she embraces the southern lifestyle and pushes those old memories away. However, when Grandfather requests her help in searching for a missing person, she must rely on his teachings as well as good dose of Southern charm to get to the bottom of things.
Beverley: How do you develop the characteristics for your heroine?
Deb: Many of my characters are based on facets of real people. Daisy is no exception. She embodies the soul of a Southern belle, who is typically tougher than they let on. Daisy tells little white lies, then tries to justify them with God. She has a heart of gold, is loyal and will fight for those in her inner circle. She prefers using charm and sweetness to get her way but is not unfamiliar with more forceful tactics. She's verbally expressive but guards her emotions fiercely. These are all traits of people I know and love, many family members.
Beverley: How long have you been writing?
Deb: I've written all my life, even garnering awards in school. I wrote a romance when I was twenty and sent it to Harlequin. They returned it with suggested revisions and requested I resubmit. Unfortunately, I was married to an emotionally abusive man who goaded me with insults until I threw the manuscript into the fireplace. I didn't write fiction again for years, choosing to concentrate on web content, newsletters and newspaper articles, instead. After my children were grown, the itch returned along with a wonderfully supportive husband. So I began seriously following my writing passion again in 2010.
Beverley: What genre do you write in and why?
Deb: I typically write sub-genres of suspense or mystery. Some include romance, some paranormal.
Beverley: Who influenced you the most in deciding to become a writer?
Deb: My mother who believed I could accomplish anything. And my daughter who is doing a marvelous job raising two boys, one with special needs. She amazes me.
Beverley: What obstacles did you have to overcome to begin creating your work?
Deb: I think I needed to find my own inner strength and balance. Then it was a matter of finding time as a single mom. But challenging life experiences has given me a depth of understanding that is invaluable.
Beverley: What gets your creative juices flowing?
Deb: A brisk hike.
Beverley: What will stop your creative muse the quickest?
Deb: Internal stress.
Beverley: What do you have for breakfast?
Deb: I'm not a breakfast person but I usually eat oatmeal or fruit.
Beverley: What do you wear when you are writing?
Deb: I'm a night owl. My pajamas or sweats.
Beverley: Where do you do most of your writing?
Deb: As a full time RVer, we travel constantly. I transformed our unit's bunkhouse into my office.
Beverley: Do you have a favorite cartoon character? Why?
Deb: I've always been partial to Tweety Bird.
Beverley: Who would you love most to meet 'in person' and why?
Deb: I had the extreme pleasure of meeting John Sandford at the Tucson Festival of Books this year. It would be fun to have a one-on-one to pick his brain. I'd also like to meet Joe Konrath who is an inspiration of for Indie authors. And Stephen King just because he's so unique.
Beverley: If you had an unexpected free day what would you do with it?
Deb: I have unexpected free days on the road. I love being outdoors - hiking the Arizona desert, climbing a mountain pass or more recently, wandering among the Hoodoos in Bryce Canyon.
Beverley: What are you working on now?
Deb: Current projects are the second book for my Dead Men series featuring Daisy O'Connor - Dead Men Can't Dance. It's almost done. I'm also working on a rather grisly episodic series about a serial killer who travels in an RV leaving behind a swath of dead bodies.

Don’t forget to check back next week for another author interview and more discussion of heroines.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Barbara White Daille on Heroines and Her New Book

Today Barbara White Daille joins us.
I write romance for Harlequin Western Romance and Entangled Bliss.  Authors of all genres include many different characters in their books, but naturally, the two most important in a romance novel are the hero and heroine.  Romance readers want to fall in love with the hero—which is a fun topic, but one for another day!
Today we’re talking heroines.
In my opinion, readers want to relate to the heroine, to connect with her, to feel for her, and sometimes even to be her.  That feeling of connectedness is why my favorite heroines are everyday women who live in the same world we do and deal with the same problems we face.

It’s probably as easy for me to show you as it is to explain, so here’s a look back at the opening of my first published book, The Sheriff’s Son. 

   The eeny-meeny-miny-mo approach to paying bills wouldn't keep creditors from her door much longer.

Sarah Lindstrom sighed, planted her elbows on the desk and buried her face in her hands.
      What she wouldn't do for some matches or a fireplace.  But the only bookstore in Dillon, Texas, wasn't the place to find either of those things, even if she were dumb enough to resort to drastic measures.  Burning the bills would only add to her problems, not solve them.

If one more straw would snap the camel's back, as Daddy used to say, then one more debt, one more unplanned doctor visit, one more call from Kevin's school ought to bring down a whole herd of cattle.

The thought of her son made her sigh again.  It was only a few weeks into the new school year, and in that short time, he'd given her more grief than in all seven years of his life combined.
You might not be able to tell from this clip that Sarah is a single mom, but you should definitely pick up that she’s a struggling mom, fighting to make a living and to put food on the table for her and her son.  A son, as you may have guessed, who is causing her some sleepless nights.

Sarah’s just like me.  And maybe a bit like you? 

We’re still paying off the replacement air conditioning/heating unit we had installed last year, so trust me, Sarah’s approach to bill paying sometimes hits very close to our home.

The thing is, she’s a true heroine, like so many women I know.

Put a woman in a tough spot, and she’ll most likely stiffen her backbone and brace herself for whatever’s coming next.  She’ll be resourceful when it comes to handling problems.  She’ll offer a strong shoulder for friends to cry on and reveal a soft heart when it comes to kids and animals.  And when life throws serious trouble in her path…?

Well, then a woman—and a true heroine—will abide by one of my favorite sayings.  I can’t give you its attribution as people disagree on the origin, and I’ve seen this written in slightly different ways, but here’s one version of the quote:

“A woman is like a tea bag—you never know how strong she is until you put her in hot water.”

That’s the kind of heroine I can look up to.

In my new release from Harlequin Western Romance, the heroine hides her real, shy self behind a sassy attitude and a flirty smile.  That’s another type of heroine I admire, one who doesn’t let anyone see her sweat!  Well…most of the time.  But as this book opens, Ally’s about to encounter a situation unlike any she’s ever experienced before.  And only time will tell whether or not she’ll survive it.

How about you?  What makes you relate to a heroine?  I’d love to know.
From the back cover of The Rancher’s Baby Proposal:

HER SECRET COWBOY CRUSH
Ally Martinez has always been known as a fun and flirty kind of gal. But deep down she’s never forgotten the cowboy who left town. When her crush Reagan Chase comes home after a five-year absence, Ally knows this is her big chance. The guy I’ve always wanted. Only Reagan has something different in mind…

Still reeling from his last relationship, Reagan needs a babysitter for his month-old son. With Ally’s help, he can get his family’s ranch ready for sale and get out of Cowboy Creek. The problem? Ally is one seriously cute distraction. But Reagan will do whatever it takes to keep his heart safe. Even if it means losing the only place—and the only woman—he can call home.
Find the book:
Amazon
https://www.amazon.com/Ranchers-Baby-Proposal-Hitching-Hotel-ebook/dp/B01LLPCDXY/

Books-A-Million
http://www.booksamillion.com/p/Ranchers-Baby-Proposal/Barbara-White-Daille/Q92625305?id=6809026813830
Harlequin
http://www.harlequin.com/storeitem.html?iid=70354
IndieBound
http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780373757596
Kobo
https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-rancher-s-baby-proposal

About Barbara:
Barbara White Daille lives with her husband in the sunny Southwest. Though they love the warm winters and the lizards in their front yard, they haven’t gotten used to the scorpions in the bathroom. Barbara also loves writing, reading, and chocolate. Come to think of it, she enjoys writing about those subjects, too!

Barbara wrote her first short story at the age of nine, then typed "The End" to her first novel many years later...in the eighth grade. Now she's writing contemporary romance on a daily basis, with an ongoing series from Harlequin Western Romance (The Hitching Post Hotel) and a new series from Entangled Bliss (Snowflake Valley).  Sign up for her newsletter to keep up with the latest in her writing life:  http://barbarawhitedaille.com/newsletter.
Find Barbara and her books online:

Website  http://www.barbarawhitedaille.com
Blog  http://www.barbarawhitedaille.com/blog Newsletter  http://www.barbarawhitedaille.com/newsletter Facebook  http://www.facebook.com/barbarawhitedaille Twitter  https://twitter.com/BarbaraWDaille Amazon author page  http://www.amazon.com/Barbara-White-Daille/e/B002J6B0QQ Harlequin author page  http://www.harlequin.com/author.html?authorid=1244 Goodreads author page
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/529361.Barbara_White_Daille
 

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Krista Ames Talks About Heroines


This week we’re going to find out a little about author Krista Ames. May’s theme is ‘Heroines’ so Krista will be talking about book covers. She’ll also tell us a little about herself and her writing, and answer some fun questions.
Born and raised in Northern Indiana, Krista now resides in Northern Lower Michigan. She is married to a very supportive man and is a stay-at-home mom of 4 very active kids. She loves to communicate with her readers so please feel free to drop her a line anytime at krista@kristaames.com or visit her at http://www.kristaames.com.

Beverley: What do you think makes a real heroine, either in real life or in books?
Krista: Overcoming the odds, staying true to herself through whatever life throws at her.
Beverley: Is it important to have strong conflicts? If yes, inner or outer conflicts, or both?
Krista: I do believe it’s important to have strong conflicts, inner and outer both, because they can really bring the characters together in the story, to form a bond.
Beverley: Who are your favorite heroines, and why?
Krista: In books, I think one of my favorite heroines is HOLLY from Colters’ Woman by Maya Banks. ( https://goo.gl/frS8KY )
Beverley: Tell me about the heroines in your book/s.
Krista: In this particular book, Dr. Miranda Chase is a veterinarian who has to come home to take over the patients for her sick father’s practice. Unfortunately, she’s unidentified as important by her father because he wanted a boy. It created a bit of a thick skin for her, enabling her to deal with people that don’t take her seriously, including the hero of Whiskey’s Sweet Revenge 😊
Beverley: How do you develop the characteristics for your heroine?
Krista: I don’t usually do anything in particular, they usually come out during the writing.  Sometimes I do have a specific look and feel in mind before I start a story.
Beverley: How long have you been writing?
Krista: Well, I guess I’ve been writing since 2005 or 2006. I didn’t have anything published until 2008 though, and just a short story in an anthology.
Beverley: What genre do you write in and why?
Krista: Typically, I write Contemporary Romance. It’s what I’ve always loved to read and is easy for me to write. I also love Western Romance and I’ve done a few of those as well. At some point in the last few years, I’ve really started to like Paranormal Romance and Romantic Suspense and I’ve actually decided to write both as well.
Beverley: Who influenced you the most in deciding to become a writer?
Krista: Believe it or not, Linda Lael Miller.  I’ve never met her, even though I’d like to, but I love, love, love her writing and it really inspired me to try my hand at it.  Compared to her, I have a very long way to go still.
Beverley: What obstacles did you have to overcome to begin creating your work?
Krista: I don’t really know that I had any to overcome.  One day I just decided to write. I was working full time but it didn’t really interfere.
Beverley: What gets your creative juices flowing?
Krista: I put some of my favorite movies on to play in the background and it just seems to work.
Beverley: What will stop your creative muse the quickest?
Krista: My kids hovering and talking
Beverley: What do you have for breakfast?
Krista: I’m not really a fan of breakfast food so normally my breakfast and lunch merge together somewhere mid morning and it can be anything from slicing up a cucumber and eating it with ranch dip, or some parmesan garlic boneless chicken bites.
Beverley: What do you wear when you are writing?
Krista: Just everyday clothes.  I always get dressed first thing because I never know when I’ll need to run my kids to school.
Beverley: Where do you do most of your writing?
Krista: Lately all of my writing has been on my new desktop, which is sitting at the dining room table.  I babysit a lot during the day so I need to be where I can see her so I transported my computer downstairs.
Beverley: Do you have a favorite cartoon character? Why?
Krista: I LOVE Scooby doo! I always watched him when my oldest was little, heck I still do when my kids aren’t around.
Beverley: Who would you love most to meet 'in person' and why?
Krista: There are a lot of people on this list actually but as far as writing. I would love to meet Linda Lael Miller to have a writing conversation with her, just ask questions about her process and her experiences with writing.
Beverley: If you had an unexpected free day what would you do with it?
Krista: SLEEP!
Beverley: What are you working on now?
Krista: A story in a boxed set called Tropical Tryst (found here:  https://www.romancecollections.com/tropical-tryst)

Blurb for Maon: Whiskey's Sweet Revenge 

A Horse Country Prequel Novella

Contemporary Western Romance

A part of the RB4U Roping the Cowboy Boxed Set

Dr. Miranda Chase didn’t want to be back home but she’d do just about anything for her dad including temporarily taking over his veterinarian practice. However, once she met Garrett, she wanted to drop everything and run.  Cocky cowboys just weren’t her thing.

Garrett Jackson cares more about his horse than himself or anyone else and when a tiny bit of a thing calling herself a vet blows into his life like a tornado, he’s literally knocked for a loop. He doesn’t have time for women.
But, when Garrett’s horse turns up missing, Miranda isn’t going anywhere. Forced to work together, they’ll learn a little bit about each other or die trying.

Buy Links:
https://www.romancecollections.com/roping-the-cowboy

You can find Krista at:

Or: https://www.facebook.com/Author-Krista-Ames-153335914718126/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/kristaames
Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Krista-Ames/e/B004FLQ9XM/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1476791352&sr=8-2-ent
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4467060.Krista_Ames
Newsletter: http://kristaames.us7.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=9613a413c5c3a9f414ca3d726&id=d18207db32
Street Team: MK’s Colorful Crew - https://www.facebook.com/groups/MKsColorfulCrew/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kristakames/?hl=en
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/kristaames/

Don’t forget to check back next week for another author interview and more discussion of heroines.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Heroines in Different Genres


Last week I talked about the Tam i Cowden’s Heroine Archetypes. This week I’m talking about heroines in different genres. Are they all strong heroines?
I’m thinking about all the different genres we write – paranormal, sci-fi, fantasy, young adult, mystery, thrillers, suspense, western, historical, cozies and sweet romance.  The heroines are so different in each genre – but do they have similar traits. Are they confident, capable, know what they want and how to get it, comfortable with their environment, focused on their goal/s and equal to the hero or the antagonist.

There are probably many other characteristics of the heroine, and they may not have all of them, but do they change with the genre.
Think of the heroine in a sweet romance, one in a thriller or one from a paranormal. The paranormal and thriller heroines might be kick-ass, but what about the sweet heroine, or the historical one? I think they all have similar traits. In a historical western, women knew how to shoot, protect their family, build log cabins. They were equals. In a sweet romance the heroine may be softer but she doesn’t bend. She knows what she wants and she gets it. And she is an equal.

And they’re all wonderful characters to write.  What do you think about heroines from different genres?

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Heroines with Min Edwards


This week we’re going to find out a little about author Min Edwards. May’s theme is ‘Heroines’ so Min will be talking about heroines. She’ll also tell us a little about herself and her writing, and answer some fun questions.
Min wears many hats... author, book designer, archaeologist, and citizen of the edge of America... Lubec, Maine, the most eastern town in the U.S. She’s a life-long reader, but I doesn't chain herself to only one genre. She loves, almost equally, romance, suspense, thrillers, sci-fi. And if a book takes her someplace she’s never been with a story that makes her heart beat with excitement, then she considers that an excellent book. She strives for the same excellence in my own stories.
Her first novel, STONE BAY, a Contemporary Romance, was published in March of 2014. It was followed by a new Romantic Suspense series, Hide Tide Suspense, bringing danger to the small village of Stone Bay, Maine. Out now in the series are STONE COLD, STONE HEART, STONE FALL and PRECIOUS STONE. Finally, for the conclusion of the series, THE RUSSIAN PHOENIX, a women’s fiction historical and the prequel to PRECIOUS STONE is coming soon. These books can be found on my Amazon Author Page: http://amzn.to/2bHJ1kb

Beverley: What do you think makes a heroine, either in real life or in books?
Min: Overcoming the odds, staying true to herself through whatever life throws at her.
Beverley: Is it important to have strong conflicts? If yes, inner or outer conflicts, or both?
Min: Yes, and I think both.
Beverley: Who are your favorite heroines, and why?
Min: Nancy Drew because she was so spunky. Claire from Outlander because she was ready at the drop of a hat for adventure. Philip Donlay’s heroine, Dr. Lauren McKenna, in his Donovan Nash thrillers because she loves her husband but doesn’t always like him or agree with him, and ultimately, she manages to nudge him toward a solution which provides a chance for them to make it out alive.
Beverley: Tell me about the heroines in your book/s.
Min: They are all strong women who love their men but don’t rely on them to save the day or themselves. This is something I look for in other authors’ writing as well. I’ve read too many novels where the heroine waits on the hero to solve her problems, but I think in today’s world of equality a woman should look inward to her own heart and strength. It’s only fair. But of course, we haven’t fully reached the ‘equality’ stage yet, but we can always hope to reach it someday.
Beverley: How do you develop the characteristics for your heroine?
Min: I start out with just one bit of worry or menace then slowly increase the danger bit-by-bit until my heroine must put her own life on the line if she wants to survive. Overcoming odds pushes my heroines to realize that they are strong and that they can protect their loved ones... but that hunky hero certainly does make the ‘clean-up of the bad guys’ easier. Hey, we women aren’t stupid. We’ll take a helping hand if it’s offered, but not forced upon us. And that’s another thing I insert in my plots: the heroes are desperate to protect their women to the point where their Alpha-ness begins to overwhelm. Well, my heroines don’t take that sitting down. They are maidens on a mission.
Beverley: How long have you been writing?
Min: In some form, academic or fiction, all my life, but publishing novels, since 2014. I have 5 fiction books self-published now with three more scheduled for release this summer
Beverley: What genre do you write in and why?
Min: Initially I wrote in Romance and Romantic Suspense, but my newest novels delve into Action/Adventure. They are archaeological thrillers that I’m co-writing with a former colleague and friend. Both of us are retired archaeologists. But I write what I love to read. I’m starting to steer away from Romance for a bit because lately I find myself enjoying thrillers by authors such as Philip Donlay, Douglas Preston and Lincoln Childs, and others.
Beverley: Who influenced you the most in deciding to become a writer?
Min: Author Julie Ortolon. When I owned an independent bookstore, A Thirsty Mind Words & Wines, she used to come in often to talk about her books and her publishers. She also taught a short class at my bookstore on writing and of course, I participated.
And my mother, who fostered my love of reading. She gave me her well-read 1939 edition of Gone With The Wind when I was around ten years old. Since then I’ve read it so many times that it needs to be rebound. I know my mom would be so proud of me now and I dedicate each of my books to her. I also took my pen name from her, Min Edwards.
Beverley: What obstacles did you have to overcome to begin creating your work?
Min: Just setting time aside each day to write was the biggest challenge. Learning the craft of writing a novel was time consuming, as well.
Beverley: What gets your creative juices flowing?
Min: They flow all the time, but dreams I guess. I have very vivid dreams, ones I can often remember when I wake. And I used to plot story-lines when I was commuting to a job in downtown Austin, Texas. I know, that was probably dangerous, but at the time I was traveling on a seldom-used ranch road... in a VW bug. Anyway, I wish I had had a voice activated recorder because I remember some of those ‘stories’ were good... and the dialogue... well, I just wish I had some of those words and phrases today.
Beverley: What will stop your creative muse the quickest?
Min: Dreary weather and wind storms. I’ve been in several tornados and hurricanes... up close and personal. I imagine I have a bit of PTSD. But strangely enough I’m in love with the study of weather and try to incorporate some kind of storm in each of my books.
Beverley: What do you have for breakfast?
Min: Coffee... and more coffee. And oatmeal. I live in Maine and hot cereal seems to be the only way to warm up some mornings. Also, just recently I re-discovered Larabars... those fruit and nut health bars. Of course, I can’t get them in the wilds of coastal Maine so I order them online. I’m addicted to the Cappuccino bars.
Beverley: What do you wear when you are writing?
Min: Jeans and ten-year-old sweatshirts. I love those sweatshirts so much, big and relaxed fit. Now, I can’t find them even on-line. So, I’m taking one that I can’t wear anymore (the material is so worn that you can actually see light through it) and having a seamstress copy it for me.
Beverley: Where do you do most of your writing?
Min: My computer is set-up on a small mid-century tea cart nestled in a window in the kitchen of my almost 200-year-old farmhouse. I also have an office next to my bedroom on the second floor, but in the winter it’s too cold up there. And since the winters goes on, and on, and on up here in Maine, I seem to stay in the kitchen for the most part.
Beverley: Do you have a favorite cartoon character? Why?
Min: Well, I like The Roadrunner. I love his crafty mind. But I don’t think I’ve seen a cartoon in decades... although I do love the occasional Disney animated movies... a secret pleasure.
Beverley: Who would you love most to meet 'in person' and why?
Min: Neil DeGrasse Tyson. I’d love to talk with him about the universe or universes. He seems so approachable. Before I wanted to be an archaeologist, I wanted to be an astrophysicist. Of course, that was in the era when women went to college to get a husband and majored in childhood education or home economics. What do they call home economics these days?
Beverley: If you had an unexpected free day what would you do with it?
Min: Read
Beverley: What are you working on now?
Min: My first women’s fiction historical, The Russian Phoenix. It begins in 1913 during the Romanov Jubilee Celebration, 300 years of Romanov rule. The story ends in the 1980s. The research is killing me, but Russia during that time was fascinating. It’s nothing like the research I did when I was an archaeologist. This is more like Trivial Pursuit... adding color and interest, only picking bits and pieces out of the fabric of history.

Blurb for The Russian Phoenix (The Russian Phoenix is the prequel to Precious Stone)
Russia: 1913. A time of celebration; a time of turmoil.
Natasha, a young cousin of Alexandra Feodorovna Romanova, the Empress Consort of all the Russias, is eighteen and living a life she never dreamed. The year is 1913; the 300th Jubilee Year of the Romanov rule and it has been filled with fetes, balls, and excitement. But the night of the last ball of the season a burgeoning love affair goes horribly wrong and she's kidnapped and whisked out of Russia. Her adventures change her life in ways she could never imagine and take her far from home. But her travails forge her into a strong, resourceful woman of the new century.

Buy Links for The Russian Phoenix:
Visit my Amazon Author Page to find out when it will be available:
Buy Links for Precious Stone:
Amazon: http://amzn.to/2fM6a85
All other venues: https://www.books2read.com/u/bP1Gk7

You can find Min at:
Website: www.MinEdwards.com
Twitter @MEdwardsAuthor
twitter.com/MEdwardsAuthor
Facebook: www.facebook.com/AuthorMinEdwards
Personal Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/athirstymind
Author Pinterest Page: www.pinterest.com/minedwards

Don’t forget to check back next week for another author interview and more discussion of book covers.