Friday, August 17, 2018

What Started You to Write?


I hope everyone is having a good summer. Rhobin has come up with another interesting topic for this month’s group blog. What started you to write?

I look forward to seeing what the other authors have to say and if any of us are similar.
 
I hope everyone is having a good summer. Rhobin has come up with another interesting topic for this month’s group blog. What started you to write?

I look forward to seeing what the other authors have to say and if any of us are similar. 

What started me to write? I honestly don’t remember. I think maybe I was born with a writing gene in my makeup. When I was four or five I used to make up stories about anything. In my teens I started to write plots. I loved the locked room murders and I would plot how someone could die in a locked room. It was great fun figuring it out. I had a folder filled with story ideas, chapters and plots.

Then I became a nurse, got married, had a family and kept thinking about stories. I’d see something or see a person and start thinking about what their story might be, but I didn’t write that book. No time.

Then I was diagnosed with breast cancer and thought maybe someone was trying to give me a wake-up call. I bought my first computer and learned how to use it. I looked at the books I read and decided I’d write a romance. I started to write this lovely romance set in Vancouver, BC and then moved to San Francisco wine country. Somehow I found myself adding details on accidents and murder and mayhem. It turned into a romantic suspense. That book is hidden under the bed, but I kept writing romantic suspense books. Once I got my wake up call to start writing, I can’t stop.

Now I’m going to check out the other members of our group and see what started them to write. 


14 comments:

  1. So, Beverley, the cancer was the start of the rest of your life, right?
    Every bit of suffering is an opportunity for growth. I am glad you grabbed yours.

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    1. You're right - it was the start of the rest of my life. Everything that happens is an opportunity for growth. You just need to be open to it.

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  2. Hi, Beverley! I began writing poetry at age nine, wrote good essays and papers, but never had the courage to write fiction. I think I needed to develop the thick skin which comes with criticism. When I went with friends on a trip, we played a car game which encouraged us to use our imagination. Two days later, I'd written eight chapters.

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    1. You were writing at a young age, whatever you wrote. I'm so glad you took that trip with friends - 8 chapters - Wow!

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  3. I think we all share much in common, Beverly. Whether that comes from before starting or after writing which I believe changes the brain, I don't know. Glad you recovered from your cancer.

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    1. I totally agree, Rhobin, as writers we all have a lot in common. Interesting thought - that writing changes the brain. I think I agree with that. And I posted on your site but I'm not sure it went through.

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  4. My first book is written on yellow paper and lives in a file at the very back of my file drawer. Not sure I want to find out just how awful it really was!

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    1. I think most of us have one of those, although mine isn't on yellow paper, but it's hidden way in the back of the shelf.

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  5. A health scare is not the best way to jolt you into action but I'm glad you started writing and and survived cancer.

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  6. No, a health scare isn't recommended but always try to find a positive in it.

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  7. It wasn't a health scare with me, but holding my dad's hand as he passed on. Then realizing I had to completely run Mom's life, because she'd developed dementia and he'd been covering for her. So I really needed a happy ending, and some folks who overcame adversity to be happy again. I wanted to be them! I could paper my bathroom, possibly my living room, with the rejection notices I've gotten. Even now I don't even get royalties until the end of the year...cup of coffee, anyone? But still...I'm a writer. That's what we do. We write.

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    1. You're right - it's what we do - write. And yours may not have been a health scare, but it was a life changing event. Glad you choose to work on the happy ending.

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  8. Your folder sounds a lot like the notebook I kept in high school, full of snippets and fun.

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  9. :) As writers I think most of us have a notebook, folder or something, stuffed with ideas.

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