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Monday, February 20, 2017

Totally Off Topic – We’ve Moved.


If I’ve missed anything or I’m late, I apologize. We have moved from our small RV to a park model, with wifi challenges, so I’m running behind. And Yahoo or Microsoft appear to have added the complication of resetting anything. You gotta love Yahoo.
We’ve debated this and finally decided we don’t want to drive a motorhome any more. We checked out park models and found one that hopefully doesn’t need any work. We bought it. We moved in 3 days ago, and have been busy unpacking and finding places for everything.  We love it. We have a few more things to do, but we’re close to being comfortably moved in.

I would also like to add that I lost a close friend this week. She was a classmate from nursing school and a year younger that me.  We roomed together for our reunions. It’s a reminder that life is fragile. Live every day to it’s fullest.

Check back for our guest spot on Thursday. 

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Do You Skip Parts of a Book?


The latest topic for this group is another interesting one. What is your saturation point? What is not enough? How do you decide what to include and when to hold back to allow the reader to fill in the blanks? Do you ever skim description when reading a book? If so, what description are you most likely to skip? 
I don’t know about you, but yes, I do skim through parts of some books. My saturation point depends on the book. JD Robb grips me with the plot, the characters, even the setting. She holds my interest, switches scenes and I’m willing to read it all. Some books dwell on setting and go on and on about the room and the furniture, or the rolling hills. Does it contribute to the story? Is the information important in moving the story along? If it is I read it and write it. If not and I read the first or second description and I realize it’s just filling space – I skip them.

If it’s a sex scene, and once again I read JD Robb’s, but if it’s written purely to write a sex scene I’ll skip it. Or if it goes on and on, page after page, for me it becomes slot A into slot B and I skip it. If it’s written to add a dimension to a relationship and help move the relationship along, or to add a few bumps to the relationship, I’ll read it. And I use the same relationship basis if I’m writing it. I can see this could be different when writing erotica.
I’m looking forward to reading what other people think about the topic. Check out these authors and add your comments.

Marci Baun  http://www.marcibaun.com/blog/
Skye Taylor http://www.skye-writer.com/blogging_by_the_sea
Anne Stenhouse  http://annestenhousenovelist.wordpress.com/
Dr. Bob Rich  https://bobrich18.wordpress.com/2017/02/18/description
A.J. Maguire  http://ajmaguire.wordpress.com/
Rachael Kosinski http://rachaelkosinski.weebly.com/
Diane Bator http://dbator.blogspot.ca/
Rhobin Courtright http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Robin Leigh Morgan on Self-pubbed and Other Writing Formats


This week we’re going to find out a little about author Robin Leigh Morgan. February’s theme is ‘Self–pubbed/traditional/ other writing formats’ so Robin will be talking about that topic. She’ll also tell us a little about herself and her writing, and answer some fun questions.  
Beverley: Are you self–pubbed, traditional or both? What made you chose that path?  And tell us how it worked for you.

Robin: I’ve self-published my two books so far, because I didn’t have the patience to go through the traditionally published path of query letter, wait, rejection [?], query letter wait, manuscript submission etc. Unfortunately with thousands of new books being released each day the competition is quite fierce.

Beverley: Have you written in any other writing formats? (non-fiction, journalism, flash fiction, poetry). If yes, can you share why you tried them and how it worked for you?  And how has it affected how you write today?

Robin: From the mid-1990’s and continually for about ten years I wrote items for a community newspaper. I’ve also dabbled in writing Flash Fiction and wound up self-publishing a collection of 100 of them.

Beverley: Is there anything else you’d like to share about differences in self-publishing and traditional publishing for today’s writer?

Robin: The major difference between the two is that in self-publishing you’re in control and responsible for all phases of getting your book published.

Beverley: How long have you been writing?

Robin: Since the mid-1990’s.

Beverley: What genre do you write in and why?

Robin: It happens to be romance primarily because I feel quite comfortable writing in it.

Beverley: What obstacles did you have to overcome to begin creating your work?

Robin: Basically it’s the same as any other author…coming up with an idea of what to write about.

Beverley: What will stop your creative muse the quickest?

Robin: It’s the proverbial affliction known as Writer’s Block.

Beverley: What gets your creative juices flowing?

Robin: Writing something in response to a prompt word, the best type is trying to write a Flash Fiction which as a limitation as to how much you can write.

Beverley: What do you have for breakfast?

Robin: I’m actually not a breakfast type of person.

Beverley: What do you wear when you are writing?

Robin: Anything that I feel would make me feel the most comfortable.

Beverley: Where do you do most of your writing?

Robin: In our spare bedroom, where I keep my desktop computer.

Beverley: If you had an unexpected free day what would you do with it?

Robin: Just relax so I can rejuvenate my entire body.

Beverley: What are you working on now?

Those of us who have chosen to write fiction come from a variety of places. And by “a variety of places,” I’m not referring to a physical location; I’m referring to our writing experiences. 

There are some of us who have enjoyed writing since we were children, and each year, by writing something in school, it improved. For some of us, it continued until we graduated college and began working. Some of us entered the work force taking jobs, which required us to write, whether it was procedures, handbooks/manuals, or news stories. But all of these are non-fiction, and each one has a set of “rules” that need to be followed to write something well enough to be acceptable.

As for myself, while my regular job did not require me to write, for eleven years I wrote articles [commentaries/viewpoints] of what was happening in my community and my feelings about it. When I began writing these items, my writing skills were not honed. I didn’t have my ideas organized in a tight manner, although my writing had been informative. By the time I’d written my last item, I’d become quite adept at it.

When I started to write fiction, I somehow drifted to writing a contemporary romance story with a paranormal element running through the storyline, but after almost 9 years I still hadn’t completed it. That is, until someone suggested I should try writing for a much younger audience, which is what I did; cumulating in my debut MG/YA Paranormal/Time Travel/First Kiss romance novel entitled I Kissed a Ghost.

Anyway, making the transition from non-fiction to fiction, I’ve had to learn a new set of rules on how to write. Most of these involved dialogue, showing not telling, where before I just told. I now had to learn about the use of tags. I had to learn not to be overly descriptive of something, but allow my reader to create the image for themselves in their minds. In the beginning I found it hard to break my old writing habits. Now I’m finding myself with these habits essentially gone. The biggest issue I still have and am trying to get a good handle on, is POV [Point of View]. Regardless of what’s happening or being said it has to be in one character’s perspective, and you can’t flip-flop between two characters within a scene. There needs to be a transition from one character to another. Today I feel my writing has improved greatly as I’m finding it easier and easier to come up with the words I want/need

Writing is an ever on-going learning experience as I learned there are additional rules for each genre, as well as for the sub-genre you’re writing in. These rules can apply to the dialogue being spoken, which needs to be true for the time period the storyline is taking place in, as well as your descriptions for your character’s clothing, and how they address each other, as is the case with the Regency sub-genre of romance novels.

So as you can see, writing is not merely a string of words you put together. There are rules that need to be followed if you’re to be well received by your readers.

Even though I had only written one book, I didn’t want to get pegged as an author of one particular genre, so I decided to expanded my audience reach by writing something totally different.  
 

On December 2, 2014, I published my second book, “Micro Fiction – An Anthology,” which is a collection of these flash fictions, and in order to round out the number of these items I wrote responses to those words I didn’t do previously; however I didn’t use the same restriction so the longest item in the book has about 390 words, and they’re not limited to any one genre.

Wanting to increase my knowledge of writing I decided to become a serious Book Reviewer towards the end of August 2014 so I could be exposed to different genres and styles of writing for each one. As of February 9, 2017, I’ve read/reviewed a total of 491 books on Amazon-US/UK where my Amazon Reviewer ranking is 2,587. I also post all of my reviews on GoodReads and LibraryThing, and sometimes on my two blog sites. I can’t tell you how much more I’ve learned about writing simply by reading the works of other authors.

 So if you’re looking for your next book to read, you’re invited to check out my reviews at:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/profile/A19QLCLVPLZH0B

I’m still learning and changing the genres I’m writing in; something which will continue until the day I decide to type that elusive period for the last book I’ve decided to write. The best place to go to learn more about me, my current writing endeavors and all of my links is to go to: http://www.about.me/rlmorgan51

Don’t forget to check back next week for another author interview and a discussion on self–pubbed/traditional/ other writing formats.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Kate Hill Blogging on Small Press


This week we’re going to find out a little about author Kate Hill. February’s theme is ‘Self–pubbed/traditional/ other writing formats’ so Kate will be talking about writing for small press. She’ll also tell us a little about herself and her writing, and her blog tour.
Always a fan of romance and the paranormal, Kate Hill started writing over twenty years ago, for pleasure. Her first story, a short erotic vampire tale, was accepted for publication in 1996. Since then she has sold over one hundred short stories, novellas, and novels.

When she's not working on her books, Kate enjoys reading, working out, spending time with her family and pets and running the Compelling Beasts Blog, dedicated to antagonists, antiheroes, and paranormal creatures. She also writes under the name Saloni Quinby.

Why I Enjoy Writing for Small Press

Back in 1996, I received my first acceptance slip ever for a story I had written. It was a short erotic vampire story and the publisher was Circlet Press. I was shocked because I had received so many rejection slips that I had started to think I would never get an acceptance.

With all those rejections, I noticed that the main difference between most small press publishers and the big publishing houses I'd contacted was the small press editors often took the time to tell me why my work was rejected. To me, that was incredibly important, especially during that phase of my writing career.

Twenty-one years later, I've had over a hundred short stories, novellas and novels accepted by small press publishers. I've never had one of the big publishers accept my work, and while I've occasionally queried them over the years, they have never been my main focus.

Not that I wouldn't like an acceptance from a big publisher, but I've been happy working with small press publishers because I've had the chance to tell stories I truly love while feeling like I'm part of a team.

I'm not saying this has been true for every small press I've worked with, but more often than not, I've thoroughly enjoyed my experiences.

My latest story, Fangs and Fists 1: Bolt, is published by Changeling Press. I've been with Changeling since 2004 and they've always been a joy to work with. When I came up with the idea for the Fangs and Fists series, my publisher and editor were great about helping flesh out the stories. I've given input on cover art and I've always had wonderful support with planning promotions.

At the moment, I have two more stories in Fangs and Fists under contract with Changeling and I'm also working on the last story in my Love in the Wild series (writing as Saloni Quinby).

Like most things, writing is an individual experience. Success is measured in different ways, depending on your personal goals. To me it doesn't matter if a book is electronic or print or whether it's indie published, published by a small press or by one of the big publishing houses. It's most important to love what you do and give readers an engaging story.
 

Blurb for Fangs and Fists 1: Bolt
Erotic Paranormal Romance

In a futuristic world ruled by demons, werewolves are enslaved to fight in gladiatorial matches for the amusement of their evil masters.

Kiara remembers what life was like living free–before she was taken by demons and bred to gladiators so that the new generations of wolves would retain their ferocity but forget their freedom. Mated to top gladiator Grit, she has a son with this surprisingly gentle lover who is also planning their escape. When Grit is killed in the arena, his close friend Bolt upholds his promise to protect Kiara and the cub.

Bolt and Kiara have loved each other from the moment they met, but they buried their feelings because she was mated to his best friend. When Grit dies, despite their guilt, Bolt and Kiara surrender to their desire for each other. Will their love be strong enough to help them win freedom from their evil masters?

Buy Links:

 
You can find Kate at:

http://www.kate-hill.com/blog
http://www.kate-hill.com/compellingbeastsblog
https://www.amazon.com/Kate-Hill/e/B002BLS7OW/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1485103167&sr=1-2-ent
http://www.facebook.com/katehillsaloniquinby
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16157.Kate_Hill
https://plus.google.com/110359814167605096582
http://www.twitter.com/katehillromance
http://www.twitter.com/compbeastsblog
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/katehill/info

Don’t forget to check back Thursday, for another author interview and a discussion on self–pubbed/traditional/ other writing formats.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Joni Sauer-Folger on Self-pubbed and Other Wrting Formats


This week we’re going to find out a little about author Joni Sauer-Folger. February’s theme is ‘Self–pubbed/traditional/other writing formats – why?’ So, Joni will be talking about various forms of writing and publishing. She’ll also tell us a little about herself and her writing, and answer some fun questions.
A native of Oregon, Joni Sauer-Folger spent twenty-two years with an airline traveling and moving around the country before settling down near the beautiful Pacific Ocean with her three very spoiled cats. She writes Urban Fantasy and Paranormal Romance under the name J.G. Sauer, and Cozy Mysteries and Romantic Suspense under Joni Folger. When she’s not spending quality time with the characters she creates, she enjoys gardening, crafting, and working in local theater.

Beverley: Are you self–pubbed, traditional or both?
Joni: I’ve been both. Got my rights back for my cozy mysteries last April and re-released them at the first of the year. All my paranormal romance & urban fantasy books are self-pubbed.
Beverley: What made you chose that path?  And tell us how it worked for you.
Joni: My favorite genres are paranormal romance & urban fantasy, but traditional publishers weren’t buying when I began to pursue publication. I was told that, though readers were still buying, the market was saturated in those genres. My agent suggested that I write a proposal for a cozy mystery. Cozies were hot at that time and my proposal sold fairly quickly. So for two years, I concentrated on the mysteries to fulfill the contract. Then I went back to writing what I loved. My agent was actually the catalyst for me going indie with my paranormal/urban fantasies, but that’s another story for another day. LOL
Beverley: Have you written in any other writing formats? (non-fiction, journalism, flash fiction, poetry). If yes, can you share why you tried them and how it worked for you?  And how has it affected how you write today?
Joni: Nope – fiction only, novels & short stories…though I’ve toyed with the idea of writing a play.
Beverley: Is there anything else you’d like to share about differences in self-publishing and traditional publishing for today’s writer?
Joni: I suppose there is a certain security in traditional publishing. Getting an advance and having a recognizable publisher’s name behind your work – not having to worry about paying for book covers, editing, etc.… On the other hand, publishers don’t do as much as they used to, so much is left up to the author anyway, like promotion – not to mention loss of rights. With self-publishing, I can write the stories in my head in my own way without constraints—which is amazing—and I retain the rights to every word I put down on paper, so to speak. However, the flip-side is that I have to do, and pay for everything myself, which takes time and effort – time and effort away from the joy of simply writing and not worrying about the rest of it.
Beverley: How long have you been writing?
Joni: Off and on since going back to college in the early 80s…though in those early days, more off than on…LOL
Beverley: What genre do you write in and why?
Joni: I write cozy mysteries under Joni Folger, and paranormal romance & urban fantasy under J.G. Sauer.
Beverley: Who influenced you the most in deciding to become a writer?
Joni: When I went back to college, my major was theater with an English minor. I had a creative writing professor that was an avid theater fan. One night after a performance, she came backstage and told me something that has stuck with me over the years. She said that while she loved to watch me on stage, she hoped that I never stopped writing because I had an incredible gift. Though it took me way too many years to come back to it, I’ve never forgotten those words.
Beverley: What obstacles did you have to overcome to begin creating your work?
Joni: Probably my own bull-headedness.  Theater is my first love. In childhood, we all ‘play pretend’, and acting/directing is my way to ‘play pretend’ into adulthood…just to someone else’s words. I’ve found that writing gives me that same joy…and I get to use my own words – the stories & voices in my head!
Beverley: What gets your creative juices flowing?
Joni: Finding an interesting idea & imagining where it could go – pulling on that thread.
Beverley: What will stop your creative muse the quickest?
Joni: Fatigue. I work 40 hours a week for Tillamook County, so sometimes after a particularly grueling day, I’ll sit down at the computer and find that I just can’t put two coherent words together. Instant buzz-kill! I envy those authors who can work at a day job, have a family to contend with when they get home, and still put out three or four books a year. Boggles my mind.
Beverley: What do you have for breakfast?
Joni: It varies. Sometimes I have oatmeal & fruit or cereal & fruit…sometimes it’s just coffee & donuts. Though I LOVE a full country breakfast – biscuits & gravy, bacon & eggs…Mmmm.
Beverley: What do you wear when you are writing?
Joni: That varies as well. Sometimes it’s the cliché of just my pajamas. LOL
Beverley: Where do you do most of your writing?
Joni: I have a section of my family room that is set up as my office. I write on my laptop there.
Beverley: Do you have a favorite cartoon character? Why?
Joni: I loved the Jetson’s & Top Cat (he had all that stuff in a garbage can!) But Mighty Mouse is probably my favorite. He was justice itself in a small but…well…mighty package.
Beverley: Who would you love most to meet 'in person' and why?
Joni: Wow…that’s a hard one, almost impossible to choose. I’m assuming you mean a ‘living person’, but there are way too many choices. I would love to meet the Queen of England - so much history there. Stephen King – the way his mind works fascinates me. Barbara Streisand – HUGE fan. Now, if you mean anyone…oh man, the pot grows exponentially!  Shakespeare, Vivaldi… (sigh)
Beverley: If you had an unexpected free day what would you do with it?
Joni: Uh…read??? Ha!
Beverley: What are you working on now?
Joni: I just started work on book 2 of my urban fantasy Guardian series, Sandman’s Lullaby. I hope to have it out by July After that, I’ve got an idea for a Christmas/New Year release that I’ve wanted to do for several years but have always run out of time. It’s a paranormal romance with a slightly different take on the Alice in Wonderland story. Should be fun…

Blurb for Immortal Savior – Immortal Prophecy, Book Two:
ISBN: 978-0-9983201-0-6
Immortal Dory Winthrop hasn’t been the Chosen One for long, but she’s already discovered that the responsibility doesn’t come without its share of trials and triumphs. Now, she and her Warrior—the man she loves, face a new threat: someone is targeting Immortals, and they aren’t excluded from the list. Together, they must discover the motive behind the deaths and unmask the killer before the lethal plan spills over into the mortal world placing humanity at risk.

New Immortal, Warrior Kaden Crenshaw, is an ex-cop abruptly pulled into a compelling and mysterious world filled with limitless possibilities, a world he’s just beginning to explore.  But with this new threat on the horizon, there’s not much time to get up to speed. He’ll need to adapt quickly and lead his team with fierce determination, if he wants to protect the Chosen One and ensure the safety of all.

Buy Links:
Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/zzg3tpe
B&N: http://tinyurl.com/zurseyh
Google Play:http://tinyurl.com/zbq6ozw
Kobo: http://tinyurl.com/h52rms2

You can find Joni at:
www.jonisauerfolger.com
https://www.facebook.com/JG-Sauer-145724772218876/
https://www.facebook.com/JoniFolger/
www.facebook.com/groups/JonisMagickMysteryTour/

Don’t forget to check back next week for another author interview and discussion of genres.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Beth Barany on Self–pubbed and Other Writing Formats


This week we’re going to find out a little about author Beth Barany. February’s theme is ‘Self–pubbed, traditional, and other writing formats’ so Beth will be talking about her experiences with these formats. She’ll also tell us a little about herself and her writing, and answer some fun questions.
Award winning author, Beth Barany writes in several genres including young adult adventure fantasy and fantasy romance. Inspired by living abroad in France and Quebec, she loves creating magical tales of romance and adventure to empower women and girls to jump into life with both feet and be the heroes in their own lives.

In her off hours, Beth enjoys walking her neighborhood, gardening on her patio, and watching movies and traveling with her husband, author Ezra Barany. They live in Oakland, California with their cat named Leo, a piano, and over 1,000 books.

When not writing or playing, Beth runs her own company helping novelists as a book midwife, coach, and teacher to help them write, market, and publish their books.
Thank you, Beverley, for this opportunity to post on your blog! What fun!

Beverley: Are you self–pubbed, traditional or both?
Beth: Self-pubbed with two unusual traditional contracts, one with an app publisher, Tapas Media, and another with an international subscription service distributor, Palatium.
Beverley: What made you chose that path?  And tell us how it worked for you.
Beth: I realized that I could pitch my novel for another few years and possibly get nowhere, or start self-publishing and get into the game. As a self-pubbed author, I can seek out interesting opportunities on my own, and I have, and continue to do so.
I’ve self-published my fiction since 2011 and it’s been a great growth experience in learning to produce and market my fiction. I love to learning by doing.
I don’t think I’m the smartest cookie in the jar. I haven’t had some of the success other self-pubbed authors have had, but my books are well-reviewed and I do sell.
Beverley: Have you written in any other writing formats? (non-fiction, journalism, flash fiction, poetry). If yes, can you share why you tried them and how it worked for you?                                                                               And how has it affected how you write today?
Beth: I’ve written lots of non-fiction articles and published non-fiction three books – motivational and how-to books for writers. I started in journalism 20+ years ago, before I knew how to write fiction. I’ve also been writing blog posts for the about 10 years.
Learning how to write nonfiction had taught me how to get over writer’s block, generate lots of ideas, and gain practice with editing and revising.
Beverley: Is there anything else you’d like to share about differences in self-publishing and traditional publishing for today’s writer?
Beth: Most writers know the differences. So, I’d like to warn new authors that if a company calls themselves a publisher, yet asks you to pay them, run fast in the other direction. If you’re paying for a service to help publish your book, you’re in charge. Get what you want and don’t let your service provider decide for you. Self-publishing means you are the publisher. Anyone calling themselves a publisher should pay you not the other way around.
Beverley: How long have you been writing?
Beth: I’ve been writing nonfiction for 26 years and writing fiction seriously for 16 years.
Beverley: What genre do you write in and why?
Beth: I write in several genres: Young Adult Fantasy, Paranormal Romance, and Science Fiction Romance.
I love YA Fantasy for the high adventure and epic sweep. I love writing romance with magical and science fiction elements because I love creating stories about strong women who jump into life with both feet and find love along the way.
Beverley: Who influenced you the most in deciding to become a writer?
Beth: I was deeply influenced by Helen Keller, who died the year I was born. I was impressed with her ability to communicate and speak her heart. I always wanted to be a writer and her persistence and stamina inspired me to get going.
Beverley: What obstacles did you have to overcome to begin creating your work?
Beth: I had to learn how to write fiction! A tall order! One of the things I realized is that I just needed to start, and also that I needed a roadmap. To design that roadmap, I had to overcome my fear of the unknown and the fear of the voices of my characters overtaking me somehow. Lastly, I had to overcome being indecisive and learn to take action despite the fear.
Beverley: What gets your creative juices flowing?
Beth: Music is probably the primary way I step into my creativity on a regular basis. I’m also inspired by film and TV, reading, and traveling to new places near and far.
Beverley: What will stop your creative muse the quickest?
Beth: Getting critiques too early in the writing process.
Beverley: What do you have for breakfast?
Beth: Eggs and kale, and coffee. Or a hard-boiled egg and coffee.
Beverley: What do you wear when you are writing?
Beth: Jeans, t-shirt, long running shirt, and a grey hoodie.
Beverley: Where do you do most of your writing?
Beth: Local cafes and diners.
Beverley: Do you have a favorite cartoon character? Why?
Beth: Perhaps Garfield. I love his indulgence and love of a good meal.
Beverley: Who would you love most to meet 'in person' and why?
Beth: I’d love to have a conversation with President Barack Obama. I’d love to hear his take on the state of the world and where he thinks things are evolving for humanity.
Beverley: If you had an unexpected free day what would you do with it?
Beth: Probably write! LOL Or I’d love to take a tour of the Tesla factory or go to NASA Ames.
Beverley: What are you working on now?
Beth: I’m working on writing the third book in my space station mystery romance series, a series I plan to launch later this year, and editing the sixth paranormal romance in my Touchstone series, to be published soon.

Blurb for A LABYRINTH OF LOVE AND ROSES

What if what you wanted got in the way of your destiny?

French MBA grad Lili Grenault needs to succeed at her last pitch meeting to fund her international green tech business. But her grandmother tells her to drop everything, find her one true love, and embrace her magical legacy by Beltane, in one week, or chaos and failure in her life will ensue.

San Francisco investor Brett Barnaby wants to find his great-grandfather’s gravesite in Amiens, France, one of the primary battle sites of World War I. Family legend says that purpose, greater mission, and perhaps even untold riches, will be unlocked when he finds that grave. But his search in Amiens brings up fear, anger, and dire warnings about some wild Green Man. He turns to local Lily Grenault for help.

Can these two independent freethinkers work together to prevent chaos from triumphing and find love in time in the labyrinth of roses?

Buy Links:
Amazon: http://bit.ly/lablovrose
Nook: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-labyrinth-of-love-and-roses-beth-barany/1123747020?ean=2940158211188
iBooks: http://apple.co/1QIEFBC
Kobo: http://bit.ly/1YYYkDB
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/603020

You can find Beth at:
http://author.bethbarany.com/.
Or connect with her on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/bethbarany, Twitter http://www.twitter.com/beth_barany, and
Instagram http://instagram.com/bethbarany.

Don’t forget to check back Thursday for another author interview.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Welcome to the FB Giveaway Contest!


Welcome to the FB Giveaway Contest!
The goal of this giveaway and contest is to get everyone to interact with one another, and in doing so, hopefully we'll come across some great books and authors in the process. 

Our prizes are: 
1 - Black and White Diamond Heart Necklace from Kay Jewelers
2 - $50 (winners choice) Gift Card
3 - $25 Visa or Mastercard Gift Card
4 - Nicolas Sparks Movie Night (2 DVDs, Popcorn and Candy)
5 - Ghost Movie Night (1 DVD, Popcorn and Candy) 

To become eligible to win any of these prizes you must enter by using the Rafflecopter link below, which does state that you have to leave a comment on the author's page. Now what that comment is, is entirely up to you. It could be "Sally sells seashells by the seashore" or something more personal like, "I loved your book ________". But you must leave a comment. That is the only way you'll gain an entry.
Earn bonus entries by commenting on the "pinned FB posts" you'll find with the above giveaway image on each of their pages. ALL entries will be confirmed, so please show these authors lots and lots of love!!! 
Direct Rafflecopter Link: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/080aaeb419/?