StatCounter

Friday, August 22, 2014

Srong Secondary Characters

Have you ever read or written a story
that had a secondary character takeover a story?
What a great question. I love this group blog. I look forward to hearing what other people have to say.

I can’t think of any books where the secondary characters actually take over the story. There are many books that have strong secondary characters but they add to the story. An example is the J.D Robb books. Dallas and Roarke are the h/h, but there are a lot of great secondary characters-Summerset, Peabody, McNab and a bunch more.  They’re all strong, interesting characters and an integral part of the story that makes it a better book and help develop the h/h characters.

I’d like to think I write the same type of secondary characters. I love writing them because they’re less restrictive and less complex, but they need to add to the character’s role. In my Holly Devine series, my secondary character is Lillian, a wealthy older woman with early Alzheimer’s, who likes to pick up bright things, like jewelry.  

In my Hawkins’ Family series I have Gran. She’s part of the family, but a strong independent character, and an integral part of the series. I love her, but I don’t think she takes over the story. I hope she adds to it.

What do you think about secondary characters? I’d love to hear other people’s opinions on this topic.

Now hop over to Diane Bator’s site and see what she has to say. http://dbator.blogspot.ca/   

And here’s the list of all the other members of this group blog.

13 comments:

  1. Glad you can keep them under control Beverley. I like the idea that they enhance the leads. Anne Stenhouse

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anne. I do think that a secondary character should be there to move the story along and add to the h/h conflict, show their little weaknesses or their strengths.

      Delete
  2. The secondary characters do add to the story and help throw the h/h into sharper focus, Beverly. Glad your tussles to keep them in place are successful.
    Geeta

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Geeta. It can be a challenge sometimes - but a fun challenge.

      Delete
  3. I agree, secondary characters quite often add the bit of whimsical needed to make a great story. Izzy from Suzanne Brockmann's Troubleshooter series comes to mind. Love that guy, :)
    Jacquie biggar

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right Jacquie. Don't know Izzy but love Suzanne. I'll have to check that one out.

      Delete
  4. Strong secondary characters add to a story. After all, we all have the crazy family member that we love and love to hate. I have a strong secondary character in the Wilder Sisters Series. It's Mr. Wilder. He has alzheimer's and tends to be a little off the wall, however... he is the glue that holds the family together. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I already love your Mr. Wilder. He sounds like my Lillian. They are fun to write.

      Delete
  5. Enjoyed your comments, Beverley. Lillian sounds like a beguiling character to me. Picks up jewelry -- bet that causes problems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rhobin. And picking up jewelry does cause problems, especially when Interpol is investigating a jewel theft ring. :)

      Delete
  6. Although secondary characters are important to any story, I dont feel they take over the story, or they would be the main characters. A secondary character can have a lasting inpression on a readers, but I think the main characters are the prime important characters with the book. A secondary character is a good character to bring back into a series book, as long as he or she has not been killed off in the first book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. Good points JoAnne, especially the one about not killing them off in the first book. :)

      Delete